3 Storyline

3 Storyline

3.1 In the beginning,
…3.1.1 in a sense, we are all time travellers

3.2 Now is the past of the future, the future of the past

3.3 You are nowhere but now-here

3.4 Living in now-here

3.5 Time messenger
…3.5.1 how to send messages to your past self
…3.5.2 how to receive messages from your future self
…………接收來自未來的訊息
…3.5.3 deja vu 似曾相識
…3.5.4 how to send messages to your future self
…3.5.5 regrets
…3.5.6 have no regrets
…3.5.7 palm
…3.5.8 preserve time

3.6 Now-here-I
…3.6.1 Foresight: prequel
…3.6.2 Where is your past-self? Where is your future-self?
…3.6.3 You are all of yourselves
…3.6.4 Now-here-I: the holographic universe
…3.6.5 Be always ready
…3.6.6 Nothing less
…3.6.7 No persistence needed
…3.6.8 Eliminate the passage of time 與時並進
…3.6.9 Event realism 事件實在論
…3.6.10 Lost in time

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2008.04.29 Tuesday (c) All rights reserved by ACHK

Time Mind I

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我最核心的興趣是:

1. 什麼是時間? What is Time? –> So I study Physics.

2. 什麼是心靈? What is Mind? –> So I study Psychology.

3. 什麼是自我? Who am I? –> So I study Philosophy.

以上是我十八歲時所想的。

— Me@2008.09.15, 2010.04.12

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2010.04.19 Monday copyright ACHK

Categorifying Fundamental Physics

A fundamental fact about quantum theory is that these operators fail to commute: aa* – a*a = 1 in units where Planck’s constant is 1. Remarkably, this fact has a simple combinatorial interpretation: there is one more way to add an element to a finite set and then remove one, than to remove one and then add one.

— Categorifying Fundamental Physics, John Baez

2010.01.06 Wednesday ACHK

6.5 Teach

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You cannot teach a man anything, you can only help him to find it for himself.

— Galileo

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To be catalyst is the ambition most appropriate for those who see the world as being in constant change, and who, without thinking that they can control it, wish to influence its direction.

— Theodore Zeldin

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The best doctors found a middle position where the were neither over-whelmed by their feelings nor estranged from them. That was the most difficult position of all, and the precise balanceneither too detached nor too caring – was something few learned.

— Michael Crichton

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2008.10.13 Monday copyright CHK^2

Translation 2

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6.4.0 Create = teach or write or both

6.4.1 Create: Teach

6.4.2 Create: Write

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The basic theme is that whenever you cannot understand something, you should try to create that thing.

How to create?

Write. Write as if you are explaining the materials to someone else.

As physicist Gerar’td Hooft advised, when reading a physics textbook “… imagine how you would write those texts in a smarter way.”

Why is that you can understand a thing when you re-write your textbook?

It is because whenever you write, you have to translate the materials into your own language.

You are CREATING your OWN knowledge.
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2008.10.11 Saturday copyright CHK^2

Translation

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6.4 Create

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The basic theme is that whenever you cannot understand something, you should try to create that thing.

How to create?

Teach. Teach that thing to someone else.

Why is that you can understand a thing when you are teaching it to other people?

It is because whenever you teach, you have to translate the materials into YOUR OWN language.

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2008.10.09 Thursday copyright CHK^2

Blackboard 2

6.3.1 Feynman’s Blackboard

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Physics
= Relativity + Quantum Mechanics
= 相對論加量子力學
= 深深深

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6.3.2 Quantum Mechanics | 量子力學

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When physicist Feynman was a student,
there were two versions of Quantum Mechanics.
They described the same thing
but in different mathematical languages.

One version was Heisenberg’s Matrix Mechanics (矩陣力學) , using matrices. Another was Schrodinger’s Wave Mechanics (波動力學), using differential equations.

Feynman could understand neither of them.
So he spent 8 years to create
his own version of quantum mechancis
in order to understand quantum mechanics [1].

Feynman’s version of quantum mechanics is now called
Feynman path-intergral. (路徑積分)

After Feynman’s death, [2] people found that Feynman had written some words on the left-hand top corner of his blackboard:

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“What I cannot create, I do not understand.”

不是由我自己想出來的東西, 我都不能理解.

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[1] Dyson, Disturbing the Universe (1979)
[2] “I’d hate to die twice. It’s so boring.” — Feynman’s last words

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2008.10.07 Tuesday copyright CHK^2

Bachelor, Master, Doctor

Chapter 6 Doctor

This chapter is on study and teaching skills.

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6.1 Bachelor, Master, Doctor

Bachelor: someone has general knowledge

Master: someone has the ability to practice a particular field of knowledge

Doctor: someone has the ability to teach a particular field of knowledge

– How to Get a PhD (book), by Estelle Phillips and Derek.S. Pugh

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學士: 通識之人

碩士: 有能力掌握一門知識的人

博士: 有能力傳授一門知識的人

–My translation

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2008.10.03 Friday copyright CHK^2

Recursion

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4.20 Life as a recursion

Arthur Schopenhauer answered: “What is the meaning of life?” by determining that one’s life reflects one’s will, and that the will (life) is an aimless, irrational, and painful drive. Salvation, deliverance, and escape from suffering are in aesthetic contemplation, sympathy for others, and asceticism.

— Wikipedia

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2008.09.30 Tuesday copyright CHK^2

Act on Fear

4.18 Dale

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Inaction breeds doubt and fear. Action breeds confidence and courage. If you want to conquer fear, do not sit home and think about it. Go out and get busy. — Dale Carnegie

It was a high counsel that I once heard given to a young person, “Always do what you afraid to do.” — Emerson

The way to develop self-confidence, he said, is to do the thing you fear to do and get a record of successful experiences behind you. — Lowell Thomas

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2008.09.25 Thursday copyright CHK^2

親歷其境

4.17.4 Influence

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When suggesting on how to write a successful book, John T. Reed wrote:

“At the Dale Carnegie public speaking class, which I highly recommend — they say anyone can make a good speech if he or she has earned the right to speak on the subject in question. How do you earn the right? By living through the subject or by doing extensive research on it — which is arguably another form of living through it. Same principle applies to how-to writing.”

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要寫到一些有用的文字, 方法只有一個: 曾經親歷其境.

— Me

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2008.09.23 Tuesday copyright CHK^2

技術細節

4.17.2 Practice

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知易行難

是因為知得不夠詳細:

只知大方向

而不知道執行時所需要的技術細節.

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例一: 讀書

版本一:

知:

大方向: 要努力讀書

技術細節: 不清楚

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行:

往往提不起勁開始讀書.

開始溫習後又很易分心.

即使溫習了數小時也好像沒有溫似的.

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版本二:

知:

大方向: 要努力讀書

技術細節:

往往提不起勁開始讀書. (是不是每次計劃的溫書量太多, 嚇怕了自己?)

開始溫習後又很易分心. (是不是因為你的電腦就在書本的旁邊? 移走電腦到視線範圍以外行嗎?)

即使溫習了數小時也好像沒有溫似的. (為什麼要一次過溫數小時呢? 每次只溫兩小時行嗎? 如果一定要連續溫習五小時的話, 是不是一定要五小時也溫同一科呢? 中途可不可以加一點休息的時間?)

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行:

技術細節知得越詳細, 實行到計劃的機會越高.

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— Me

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2008.09.21 Sunday copyright CHK^2

三部曲

4.17 Practice
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The difference between theory and practice is small in theory but big in practice.

係理論上, 理論上同實際上係無乜分別o既; 但係實際上, 理論上同實際上係有好大分別o既.

理論上, 理論上和實際上是沒有什麼分別的; 但實際上, 理論上和實際上是有很大分別的.

— Me, based on an existing quotation

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The principle of science, the definition, almost, is the following: The test of all knowledge is experiment. Experiment is the sole judge of scientific “truth.”

— Richard P. Feynman (The Feynman Lectures on Physics, 1963)

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大部分的人生道理聽了其實是沒有用的. 原因是大部分人也沒有做足以下四個步驟.

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4.17.1 Theory

4.17.2 Practice

4.17.3 Habit

4.17.4 Influence (夢幻版)

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2008.09.16 Tuesday copyright CHK^2

X-Files

4.16 Impossible

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If you want to imagine what the world is going to be like in the future,

don’t work for what’s possible now.

Start by imagining the impossible,

only then we even get close to a vision of our fantastic future.

— Gillian Anderson, Future Fantasic

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To be creative, think not what is possible, but what is impossible.

— My own modification.

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要有創意, 不要由可能的事情想起;
要有創意, 要先由不可能的事情想起.

— Translation by Me.

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2008.09.13 Sunday copyright CHK^2

“Why not?”

4.15 Shaw

1. You see things as they are and ask, “Why?” I dream things as they never were and ask, “Why not?” — George Bernard Shaw, Back to Methuselah (1921)

2. Reasonable people adapt themselves to the envirnoment; unreasonable adapt envirnoment to themseleves. Therefore, all human progress are made by unreasonable people. — George Bernard Shaw, Maxims for Revolutionists (1903)

3. Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail. — Muriel Strode ( ? )

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2008.09.12 Friday copyright CHK^2