Jump 2

4.10.5 Not enough

.

.

1. “You’ve got to jump off the cliff all the time and build your wings on the way down.” — Ray Bradbury

2. 看風不用播種, 看雲不用收割. — 傳道書

.

.

.

At a time, I had a discussion with a friend. He asked me whether I would apply for an engineer-training job in order to get an engineer license. I said I did not have enough capacity for such a job. He replied, “If you feel that you are not enough, you are always not enough. The point is not to be enough right now. The point is to get the job first, and then make yourself be enough for it.”

.

.

.
2008.09.10 Wednesday copyright CHK^2

4.13 Walk

Step-by-step approach

1. “He who would learn to fly one day must first learn to stand and walk and run and climb and dance; one cannot fly into flying.” — Friedrich Nietzsche

2. “For things we persist doing become easier, not because of the change of the nature of the thing, but because of the increase of our ability. ” — Emerson

3. “What does not destroy me, makes me stronger.” — Friedrich Nietzsche

.

.

.

2008.09.08 Monday copyright CHK^2

Mistakes 2

.

4.12 Dyson

.

1. “`Always make new mistakes” — Esther Dyson

2. “`Always make new mistakes” — Esther Dyson

3. “There is no way to find the best design except to try out as many designs as possible and discard the failures.” — Freeman Dyson

4. “If you want to have good ideas you must have many ideas. Most of them will be wrong, and what you have to learn is which ones to throw away.” — Linus Pauling

5. “Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep.” — Scott Adams, The Dilbert Principle

.

.

.

2008.09.06 Saturday copyright CHK^2

Feynman

4.11 A physics career

A young man wrote physicist Feynman a letter, asking how to know whether he was suitable for a physics career. Feynman gave the following reply:

“I say this. Try to find some friends who are somewhat interested in physics and try to discuss physics things with them. If you find yourself able to explain things in your own words, so that they are led to understand things from what you say, you are OK. Soon you will find yourself able to explain things to yourself. Otherwise, give up and plan for a different career. If you can’t find such friends, try to tutor elementary physics, and see how it goes.” [12]

.

.
[12] Don’t you have time to think p.256

.

.

.

2008.09.05 Friday copyright CHK^2

Hacker

4.10 Hacker approach [10]

1. “a belief that even though you may not know all of what you need to solve a problem, if you tackle just a piece of it and learn from that, you’ll learn enough to solve the next piece – and so on, until you’re done.”

–Eric S. Raymond’s How To Become A Hacker

2. “… began doing just one thing ever which he had control.”

— Stephen Covey

3. “So start small, and think about the details. Don’t think about some big picture and fancy design. If it doesn’t solve some fairly immediate need, it’s almost certainly over-designed.”

— Linus Torvalds

4. “I have never been especially impressed by the heroics of people convinced that they are about to change the world. I am more awed by those who struggle to make one small difference after another.”

— Ellen Goodman

.

.

.

[10] Hacker here means a highly skilled programmer, not a computer criminal.

“In academia, a “hacker” is a person who follows a spirit of playful cleverness and enjoys programming.”

– Wikipedia on Hacker (academia)

.

.

.

2008.09.03 Wednesday copyright CHK^2

Hacker: Prequel

4.10 Hacker approach [10]

.

1. “a belief that even though you may not know all of what you need to solve a problem, if you tackle just a piece of it and learn from that, you’ll learn enough to solve the next piece – and so on, until you’re done.”

–Eric S. Raymond’s How To Become A Hacker

.

.

1.5 “a belief that

even though you may not know all of what you need to solve a problem,

if you tackle just a piece of it and

learn from that,

you’ll learn enough

to solve the next piece

– and so on,

until you’re done.”

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

10 Hacker here means a highly skilled programmer, not a computer criminal.

“In academia, a “hacker” is a person who follows a spirit of playful cleverness and enjoys programming.”

– Wikipedia on Hacker (academia)

.

.

.

2008.08.29 Friday copyright CHK^2

Contents Chapter 4

Contents

Preface 緣起

1 Additional Mathematics
2 Applied Mathematics
3 Storyline
4 Master

What

4.1 自傳
4.2 根據地
4.3 兼職
4.4 奇遇記
4.5 尋尋覓覓
4.6 才能
4.7 以終為始
4.8 夢幻路
4.9 受難曲

How

4.10 Hacker
4.11 Feynman
4.12 Dyson
4.13 Walk
4.14 Jump
4.15 Shaw
4.16 Impossible
4.17 Practice
4.18 Dale
4.19 Master
4.20 Recursion

5 Writing
6 Doctor
7 Painting

A Storyarc

.

.

.

2008.08.27 Wednesday copyright CHK^2

4.9 Burkhard Heim

.
.

“The accident left him without hands and mostly deaf and blind when he was 19.”

“Heim had to undergo a series of operations after the explosion which resulted in the loss of his arms. He found that intense concentration on the study of Einstein’s relativity theory helped him control the pain in his arms mentally and physically.”

– Wikipedia

.

.

Me: Physics 能醫百病
.

.

.
2008.08.21 Thursday copyright CHK^2

4.8 Follow your bliss

.

BILL MOYERS: Do you ever have the sense of… being helped by hidden hands?

.

JOSEPH CAMPBELL: All the time. It is miraculous. I even have a superstition that has grown on me as a result of invisible hands coming all the time – namely, that if you do follow your bliss you put yourself on a kind of track that has been there all the while, waiting for you, and the life that you ought to be living is the one you are living. When you can see that, you begin to meet people who are in your field of bliss, and they open doors to you. I say, follow your bliss and don’t be afraid, and doors will open where you didn’t know they were going to be.

* * *

My general formula for my students is “Follow your bliss.” Find where it is, and don’t be afraid to follow it.

– Joseph Campbell, The Power of Myth, pp. 120, 149

.

.

.

2008.08.20 Wednesday CHK_2

以終為始 數學版 1

4.7 Begin with the End in Mind

Author Stephen Covey had written an influential book : The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People.

The second habit is Begin with the End in Mind. Here is the mathematical version of it.

.

Assume you have a goal, a dream, or anything like that. We call it to be the n-th step.

Clarify what your n-th step really is. Once done, ask yourself,

“What is the step before the n-th step?”

Clarify what your (n-1)-th step really is. Once done, ask yourself,

“What is the (n-2)-th step?”

Clarify what your (n-2)-th step really is. Once done, ask yourself,

“What is the (n-3)-th step?”

. . .

Clarify what your third step really is. Once done, ask yourself,

“What is the second step?”

Clarify what your second step really is. Once done, ask yourself,

“What is the first step?”

What is your first single step towards your goal that you can take action on right now, right here?

.

.

後天將有中文版.

.

2008.08.18 Monday copyright CHK^2

.

P. S. 達明小明: 最後的十四天.

4.6 才 | 能

.

“There’s a common misconception that a person’s skill is their talent. Skills, however, are not talents. Talents, on the other hand, requires skills.”

— The 8th Habit p.76

.

“Don’t confuse transferable skills with traits.”

— What color is your parachute? 2005 Edition p.141

.

.

大部分人也分不清技能與天份.

天份需要技能的支撐. 但是技能本身不是天份.

.

例如:

如果你的運算能力技巧很差的話,

你很難說服人你有數學天份.

.

但是即使你的運算能力高,

亦不代表你有數學天份, 有數學傾向.

因為除了運算能力外,

數學天份還需要其他技能和性格特質的支持, 才能發揮.

.

— Translation by Me

.

.

2008.08.17 Saturday copyright CHK^2

找例外 5

4.5.2 part 2

“Do not follow the rules. Instead, look for exceptions.”

– What color is your parachute? 2005 Edition

.

.

不要老是跟著規則走.

老是跟著規則走的話, 你會損失很多  大機會.

.

.

例子二:

以前在實驗室工作時,

教授請來了一位同事.

該位同事的寫程式才能很高.

.

.

但是研究院認為他的英文能力未達基本要求, 不能收他.

另一方面, 教授卻認為該位同事是一位程式奇才, 不能放棄.

結果, 在教授的推薦下, 研究院收了他.

條件只是要他補考英文的公開試, 以證明他的英文有進步, 已達研究院的英文基本要求.

.

.

試想想,

如果那位同事是跟著規則走, 按一般程序報讀研究院的話,

以他的英文能力, 在第一階段的遴選將會被拒絕.

.

.

哪他怎樣不跟規則走呢?

.

.

他先找教授, 說服教授

他的程式能力是一個大優點.

這個優點所帶來的好處, 遠遠超過他的英文所帶來的不好處.

而他英文差這個缺點是不難補救的.

令教授願意收他為研究生.

.

.

.

2008.08.14 Thursday copyright CHK^2

找例外 3

4.5.2 part 2

“Do not follow the rules. Instead, look for exceptions.”

– What color is your parachute? 2005 Edition

.

.

但是怎樣想到辦法, 先找到一份教學工作呢?

.

.

可以試試這樣想:
(改篇自 <<What Color is Your Parachute?>> 的說法)

.

.
有哪個人曾經   在沒有教育文憑的情況下    找到教學的工作呢?

他額外做了些什麼事情  或者  他有什麼特別的資歷

導致他能避免教育文憑呢?

你有沒有那些特別的資歷?

.

.

.
2008.08.08 Friday copyright CHK^2

找例外 2

4.5.2 part 2

“Do not follow the rules. Instead, look for exceptions.”

– What color is your parachute? 2005 Edition

.

.

.

不跟規則走的話, 可以這樣:

先想想有沒有辦法

在沒有教育文憑的情況下

找到一份教學工作

找到以後, 那就可能不用再讀教育文憑了.

如果要的話, 你可以讀 part time 的教育文憑補救.

這樣的話, 你就不用擔心讀完教育文憑後, 找不到教學的工作.

.

.

但是怎樣想到辦法, 找到一份教學工作呢?

.

.

.
2008.08.05 Tuesday copyright CHK^2

找例外

4.5.2 part 2

Do not follow the rules. Instead, look for exceptions.”

— What color is your parachute? 2005 Edition

.

.

不要老是跟著規則走.

老是跟著規則走的話, 你會損失很多  大機會.

.

.

例子一:

假切你已大學畢業生. 你想做老師.

做老師的先決條件是有教育文憑.

但是你沒有教育文憑.

.

.

跟著規則走的話,

解決方法是你先讀一個教育文憑, 然後再找教學工作.

但是這樣有一個小問題, 一個中問題, 一個大問題:

.

1. 讀教育文憑需要額外花一年的學費;

2. 讀教育文憑需要額外花一年的時間,

那一年你將沒有薪金 (大約180,000港元);

3. 近年, 由於學生的人數大量減少, 大部分教育文憑的畢業生也找不到教學工作, 需另投他行.

.

.

.

2008.08.03 Sunday copyright CHK^2

Job: Focus

4.5.1b

.

The less you try to “stay loose” and open to anything,

the more precisely you define your skills

with Data/Information and/or People and/or Things in detail

and at the highest level you legitimately can claim,

the more likely you are to find a job.

.

.
— What color is your parachute? 2005 Edition p.143 [Bold letters are mine]

.

.

.

2008.07.27 Sunday CHK^2

Edward Witten

Edward Witten has received the highest h-index among the physicists. In this sense, he is the best physicist in the world now.^1 What makes me really surprised is that he was not major in physics as an undergraduate student. He was major in history. While working as a physicist, he received the highest honor in mathematics, Fields Medal.^2

“Birth and education

Edward Witten was born in Baltimore, Maryland to a Jewish family, the son of Lorraine W. Witten and Louis Witten, a physicist specializing in gravitation and general relativity. He received his bachelor’s degree in history (with a minor in linguistics) from Brandeis University. Witten planned to become a political journalist, and published articles in The New Republic and The Nation. He worked briefly for George McGovern’s presidential campaign. Then, he attended the University of Wisconsin-Madison for one semester as an economics graduate student before dropping out. He then returned to academia, enrolling in applied mathematics at Princeton University before shifting departments and receiving a Ph.D. in physics in 1976 under David Gross, the Nobel laureate in Physics in 2004.” — Wikipedia

.

witten

.
Figure 4.1: Witten’s career path
(This figure is made and copyrighted by me. Copy it as you like.)

.

.
Even the best people in world need such a long time to find their true love career.

How about you?

What is your true love?
.

.

.

1 as of 2007
2 Fields Medal is the “Nobel prize” in Mathematics.

.

.

.

.

2008.07.19 Saturday \copyright CHK^2