Basically, Python can be seen as a dialect of Lisp with “traditional” syntax (what Lisp people call “infix” or “m-lisp” syntax).

Python can be seen as either a practical (better libraries) version of Scheme, or as a cleaned-up (no $@&% characters) version of Perl.

One of Python’s controversial features, using indentation level rather than begin/end or braces, was driven by this philosophy: since there are no braces, there are no style wars over where to put the braces. Interestingly, Lisp has exactly the same philosphy on this point: everyone uses emacs to indent their code, so they don’t argue over the indentation.

Take a Lisp program, indent it properly, and delete the opening parens at the start of lines and their matching close parens, and you end up with something that looks rather like a Python program.

— Python for Lisp Programmers

— Peter Norvig

2012.05.22 Tuesday ACHK