Particle indistinguishability is the major source of quantum effects, 1.1

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If particles are distinguishable, there is no quantum-ness.

Why?

— Me@2021-02-06 4:00 PM

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If there is no particle indistinguishability, all trajectories are distinguishable, then there is no case indistinguishability.

In other words, if every trajectory is well-defined, there is no indistinguishability of cases, even when no detector is installed.

Why?

— Me@2021-02-06 4:01 PM

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In other words, how to define “every trajectory is well-defined” when no detector is installed?

— Me@2021-02-15 5:00 PM

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Thought experiment:

In the double-slit experiment, turn on the detector. Then observe the pattern on the final screen.

Next, tune down the detector’s accuracy/resolution a little bit. Repeat the experiment. Observing the pattern again.

Keep repeating the experiment with a little bit lower detector accuracy/resolution at each iteration.

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If a non-classical pattern never appears on the final screen, we can say that each trajectory is well-defined.

In other words, if the trajectory concept can predict correct experiment results, we say that the trajectory concept is well-defined.

— Me@2021-02-06 4:02 PM

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It is because the final screen itself is a kind of detector, although not a position detector.

— Me@2021-02-06 05:07:21 PM

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So it is a kind of Bell-type experiment.

— Me@2021-02-07 06:03:53 PM

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However, this definition of “every trajectory is well-defined” has a problem.

If the trajectory concept cannot predict correct experiment results, “the trajectory concept is broken” is only one of the possible causes.

In other words, how can you know the non-classical results (aka quantum effects) are not due to other factors?

— Me@2021-02-15 05:03:20 PM

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2021.02.15 Monday (c) All rights reserved by ACHK