The square root of the probability, 3.2.1

Eigenstates 3.3.2.1

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According to Schrödinger, the Copenhagen interpretation implies that the cat remains both alive and dead until the state has been observed. Schrödinger did not wish to promote the idea of dead-and-live cats as a serious possibility; on the contrary, he intended the example to illustrate the absurdity of the existing view of quantum mechanics.

— Wikipedia on Schrödinger’s cat

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Quantum mechanics seems to be unacceptable not because it is strange. Any new science must be strange because it must contain something never known and never expected before.

Quantum mechanics seems to be unacceptable not because it is strange, but because common quantum mechanics education, especially popular science, is so misleading that it makes quantum mechanics look bad; people falsely believe that quantum mechanics violates some of Aristotle’s 3 laws of logic:

1. Law of identity

2. Law of non-contradiction

3. Law of excluded middle

These 3 laws basically mean that

For any proposition A, either A is true or \text{NOT}~A is true, but not both.

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Actually, quantum mechanics does NOT allow any violation of these logical laws. A quantum superposition state is NOT any “overlapping” of multiple physical states. A quantum superposition state is ONE single physical state.

Contrary to popular belief, Schrödinger created the thought experiment to illustrate that a quantum superposition state should NOT be regarded as any “overlapping” of multiple physical states.

To explain that, we should use the most basic quantum experiment, the double-slit experiment, instead of the cat experiment, because:

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Although we can regard the cat itself as a system of fundamental particles, we should not do so in this case. Instead, we should just regard the cat itself as one classical object (system).

If we regard the cat itself as a system of fundamental particles, the superposition quantum state will need to include also the classically-makes-NO-sense particle configurations as component eigenstates. In other words, besides the cat-alive state and cat-dead state, the superposition quantum state will need to also include, for example:

1.1   the state of “the cat transforms into a dog”;

1.2   the state of “the cat disappears”;

1.3   the state of “half of the cat becomes a computer and half becomes a harddisk”;

1.4   etc.

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The major fault of the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics is that it includes only the eigenstates (worlds) that make common sense.

2.1

2.2

— Me@2022-01-30 04:21:17 PM

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2022.01.30 Sunday (c) All rights reserved by ACHK