Verification principle, 2

Verification- and falsification-principles

The statements “statements are meaningless unless they can be empirically verified” and “statements are meaningless unless they can be empirically falsified” are both claimed to be self-refuting on the basis that they can neither be empirically verified nor falsified. 

— Wikipedia on Self-refuting idea

Verification principle: That meaningful statements should be analytic, verifiable or falsifiable

Falsifiability: The possibility that an assertion may be disproved

— Wikipedia on Verification theory

Strong verification principle (aka verification principle) may or may not be self-refuting, depending on whether your regard it as an analytic statement or not. It can be regarded as an analytic statement (aka tautological statement) in a sense that verification principle defines what “meaningful” means, distinguishing meaningful statement from meaningless one. It is related to the definitions of “analytic statement” and “synthetic statement”.

Weak verification principle (aka confirmation principle) is not self-refuting.

Falsification principle is not self-refuting. Falsification principle is about science statements. Itself is not a science statement. Instead, it is part of the definition of “science statements” (aka synthetic statements). So it should not be applied to itself.

— Me@2011.10.21

2011.10.21 Friday (c) All rights reserved by ACHK