3.6.1 Foresight: prequel

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Suppose you are an A-Level student. You desire to be a university student.

You should know that

(1997 – 1999; study hard) \Leftrightarrow (1999 – 2002; university student)

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In 1997, I wanted to be a university student. I could not transform myself to be a university student immediately. I could not travel to 1999, becoming a university student at once. However, I knew that, ideally, if I worked hard (and work smartly) in now (1997), I would be able to enter university. In other words, the event “`being a university student in 1999″‘ is equivalent to the event “`studying hard in 1997″‘.

I could not control an event in 1999 as it was in my future. But I could control the present-equivalence of the future event.

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2008.04.13 Sunday \copyright CHK^2

Copy Me

Philosopher John Locke published “An Essay Concerning Human Understanding” in 1689, in which he proposed the following criterion for personal identity: if you remember thinking something in the past, then you are the same person as he or she who did the thinking. Later philosophers raised various logical snarls, most of them caused by applying Boolean logic, the prevalent logic system at the time. It has been proposed that modern fuzzy logic can solve those problems, showing that Locke’s basic idea is sound if one treats personal identity as a continuous rather than discrete value.

— Wikipedia

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2008.04.13 Saturday CHK_2